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Edward (Ned) Kelly First Hand Accounts Glenrowan History Sergeant Steele The Police The Railway

The Kelly Bushrangers (3 July 1880)

The following description of what took place at Glenrowan is taken from the Melbourne Age of June 29, and although going over the same ground as the telegrams already published, contains fuller information…

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Research The Author Speaks Writing

The Author Speaks: On Understanding Historical Figures

“It was that moment that I realised how important it is to understand people from history, just as we do with people in the present, based on contextual factors and free of prejudices. That is to say that they deserve to be looked at based upon demonstrable qualities rather than trying to pigeon hole them based on perceptions or preconceived ideas. People are nuanced, multifaceted beings. They have virtues and flaws, regardless of which is more dominant, and these often paradoxical elements coalesce into what we define as a personality. It’s all very Yin/Yang, but this is the reality.”

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First Hand Accounts News Reports

Charge of Harbouring the Kelly Gang (26 November 1880)

Anne Jones, late of the Glenrowan Hotel, was charged before the Wangaratta Bench this morning, under the 275th clause of the Criminal Offences Statute, with harbouring a felon.

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First Hand Accounts History Sergeant Steele

The Kelly Gang. New Light on an Old Tragedy (23 September 1911)

A compilation of interviews conducted by Brian Cookson of Ann Jones, Arthur Steele and Paddy Allen.

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First Hand Accounts Sergeant Steele The Police

Sgt. Steele Interviewed by Cookson

“But, all the same, I may as well say that my success was owing to my using a shot gun instead of a rifle or pistol. It was no use trying to reach a vulnerable place in that man’s armour with a bullet. Shot was the stuff for that job; good big shot. And that’s what I got him with at last…”

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First Hand Accounts History

Anton Wicks’ Testimony

Testimony given by Anton Wicks (i.e. Wick, Weekes) regarding Aaron Sherritt’s death.

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First Hand Accounts Glenrowan

The Postmaster Interviewed (2 July 1880)

“When he stuck up Bracken at the police station, he went into Bracken’s bedroom, and found Mrs. Bracken in bed with her little son. He shook hands with the little boy, and said, “I may be worth £2000 to you yet, my child.” He then demanded handcuffs and cartridges from Bracken, who had, however, to defend his office, where these things were, by cunning, evasive replies, for had Kelly got the handcuffs he would in all probability have put a pair on the constable, who would then have been unable to escape from the hotel, as he so opportunely did.”

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The Author Speaks Writing

The Author Speaks: on the hierarchy of needs and characterisation

An exploration of how an understanding of psychology can help turn historical figures into fully fleshed and authentic characters.

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The Author Speaks

The Author Speaks: Regarding the story behind a moment of crude defiance

“Still, better than a wombat hole, hey, McIntyre?”

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The Author Speaks

The Author Speaks: Regarding Ned Kelly’s Warnings

Ned Kelly gave forewarning of the scale of his Glenrowan plot, as well as some of the motivation behind it, in the letters he wrote with Joe Byrne at Euroa and Jerilderie. At the time these seemed to be more or less hollow threats, but following the Glenrowan tragedy they are almost chilling in their forewarning.